Facts/Statistics

World Bank-RWSN COWASH Webinar

Yesterday I sat in on another webinar talking about Community-Led Accelerated WASH in Ethiopia, or COWASH.  The presentation was given by Arto Souminem who is the Chief Technical Advisor of the COWASH program in Ethiopia.  Arto also works for Ramboll Finland which is a large consulting firm, and has a Master’s of Science in water supply and sanitation as well as over 25 years experience in leading rural and urban bilateral water and sanitation projects funded by the Finnish governmentcontinue reading

WASH and Equity Webinar – Part 2

Welcome to part 2 of my WASH and Equity Webinar summary.  If you missed part 1 it’s below this post so just scroll down.  Let’s get started.  This first slide shows the inequality of urban drinking water coverage between the rich and the poor (note there’s a typo in the heading, the poorest 20% should say “left” end of the bar).  It’s pretty shocking and makes it very easy to see the divide between rich and poor.  This information wascontinue reading

WASH and Equity Webinar – Part 1

Yesterday I listened in on a webinar give by Andrew Trevett – Senior Adviser, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, UNICEF, and Rolf Luyendijk, Senior Statistics and Monitoring Specialist, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, UNICEF.  The webinar talked about WASH and equity, focusing primarily on rural populations vs urban and was based off of a WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) report on drinking water.  This presentation was talking mainly from a monitoring standpoint so it’s mainly a look at statistics gathered over the past 10continue reading

What the Frack?

Fracking is the process of hydraulically injecting a mixture of fluids into naturally forming veins or dikes in rock in order to release petroleum, natural gas, or coal seam gas.  The mixture injected is typically a slurry of water, proppants (including silica sand, resin-coated sand, and man-made ceramics), and chemical additives. Additionally, gels, foams, and compressed gases, including nitrogen, carbon dioxide and air can be injected.   Further, sometimes sand containing naturally radioactive materials are used to measure the fracture trace.  There are alsocontinue reading

Saving water at home

Let’s start with a couple of statistics: An American taking a five-minute shower uses more water than a typical person in a developing country slum uses in a whole day. (2006 United Nations Human Development Report.) The average person in the developing world uses 2.64 gallons of water a day. The average person in the United Kingdom uses 35.66 gallons of water per day. The average person in the United States uses between 100 and 175 gallons every day at home. (https://blueplanetnetwork.org) One toilet flush usescontinue reading

Water Crisis Facts

Here are a handful of troubling statistics on the water crisis: 783 million people in the world do not have access to safe water. This is roughly 11% of the world’s population. (WHO/UNICEF) 2.5 billion people in the world do not have access to adequate sanitation, this is about 35% of the world’s population. (WHO/UNICEF) 1.4 million children die every year as a result of diseases caused by unclean water and poor sanitation. This amounts to around 4,000 deaths a day or one every 20 seconds . (WHO) Hand-washing with soap atcontinue reading

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