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In 2021 we will be working on our next project in Motuse, Nicaragua. For this project we’re partnering with a great organization named CoCoDA, and their in-country partner, The National Community Movement (MCN). CoCoDa has been working in Central America since 1992, completing projects in the areas of water and sanitation, health, education, housing and the environment, among others. We’re excited for this partnership, and for the project in Motuse. 

Motuse is located in the north-west of Nicaragua, and has a population of about 600 people. Water wells in the area that were tested show high levels of nitrates and ammonia, almost certainly from fertilizer used on crops, as well as high alkalinity. For this project we will be drilling a well, installing solar powered pumps, and constructing a collection and distribution system. 

As part of this project we’ll also be piloting a solar powered ultraviolet water purification system. This system will include a simple filter paired with UV light to remove nitrates and ammonia, as well as pathogens and bacteria from the water. Because this is a pilot project, each household will also be given a water filter for their house as backup. 

Your donation to HydrateLife will have a direct impact on the lives of the people of Motuse by bringing them sustainable, clean water. 

Project start: Spring of 2021

Solar Powered Water for Motuse - Motuse, Nicaragua

This project will serve the 623 people in the community of Motuse, Nicaragua, and will aim to accomplish two goals. First, it will provide a reliable source of clean water to everyone in the community, and do it in an environmentally friendly manner. 

Second, it will give hours of time back to the women and children of the community who walk up to 1.25 miles to get to their current source of water, hours that can be used to better themselves, and their community. 

Our Partners

For this project we’re partnering with a great organization named Companion Community Development Alternatives, or CoCoDA, and their in-country partner, The National Community Movement (MCN). CoCoDa has been working in Central America since 1992, completing projects in the areas of water and sanitation, health, education, housing and the environment, among others. We’ll also be receiving assistance from the Municipality of Somoto, and the community of Motuse will be involved in all aspects of the project and provide labor on the project. We’re excited for these partnerships, and for this project in Motuse!

This project will serve the 623 people in the community of Motuse, Nicaragua, and will aim to accomplish two goals. First, it will provide a reliable source of clean water to everyone in the community, and do it in an environmentally friendly manner. 

Second, it will give hours of time back to the women and children of the community who walk up to 1.25 miles to get to their current source of water, hours that can be used to better themselves, and their community. 

Our Partners

For this project we’re partnering with a great organization named Companion Community Development Alternatives, or CoCoDA, and their in-country partner, The National Community Movement (MCN). CoCoDa has been working in Central America since 1992, completing projects in the areas of water and sanitation, health, education, housing and the environment, among others. We’ll also be receiving assistance from the Municipality of Somoto, and the community of Motuse will be involved in all aspects of the project and provide labor on the project. We’re excited for these partnerships, and for this project in Motuse!

Background

Motuse is a rural, farming community in north-west Nicaragua, and has a population of 623 people in 140 homes. There is also a school, and three churches. Its name makes reference to an ancient farm that had the same name. It is mainly inhabited by displaced people from the 1980-1989 civil war who previously lived in nearby municipalities.

Wells in the area that were tested show the presence of nitrates and ammonia, almost certainly from agricultural runoff, as well as high alkalinity. 

Project Details

Although there are two existing community wells in the area, their conditions are unknown, and so a new well will be drilled to ensure a dependable source of water. An 18 panel solar array will power the pumps which will send water from the well to two water towers. From there the water will gravity feed to all 140 homes, one school, and three churches.

Background

Motuse is a rural, farming community in north-west Nicaragua, and has a population of 623 people in 140 homes. There is also a school, and three churches. Its name makes reference to an ancient farm that had the same name. It is mainly inhabited by displaced people from the 1980-1989 civil war who previously lived in nearby municipalities.

Wells in the area that were tested show the presence of nitrates and ammonia, almost certainly from agricultural runoff, as well as high alkalinity. 

Project Details

Although there are two existing community wells in the area, their conditions are unknown, and so a new well will be drilled to ensure a dependable source of water. An 18 panel solar array will power the pumps which will send water from the well to two water towers. From there the water will gravity feed to all 140 homes, one school, and three churches.

As part of this project we’ll also be piloting a solar powered ultraviolet (UV) water purification system. This system will include a simple filter to remove the nitrates and ammonia paired with UV light to remove pathogens and bacteria from the water. 12 families will use this system, and because this is a pilot project each household will also be given a water filter for their house. For more information on how UV is used to purify water you can read an article I wrote by clicking here.

The Need

Women and children are the ones who spend hours each day in search of water at springs or the community wells. These are usually located at considerable distance from their homes. The time required to collect water keeps them from working, studying, playing, and so on. In the picture at the top of the page, two young girls are carrying buckets of water on their heads. This project will give these women and children their time back, letting the kids focus on being kids, and the women work or have more time for other responsibilities.

As part of this project we’ll also be piloting a solar powered ultraviolet (UV) water purification system. This system will include a simple filter to remove the nitrates and ammonia paired with UV light to remove pathogens and bacteria from the water. 12 families will use this system, and because this is a pilot project each household will also be given a water filter for their house. For more information on how UV is used to purify water you can read an article I wrote by clicking here.

The Need

Women and children are the ones who spend hours each day in search of water at springs or the community wells. These are usually located at considerable distance from their homes. The time required to collect water keeps them from working, studying, playing, and so on. In the picture at the top of the page, two young girls are carrying buckets of water on their heads. This project will give these women and children their time back, letting the kids focus on being kids, and the women work or have more time for other responsibilities.

bucket head-colorizedfinal-min

The other need is for clean water. Gastrointestinal illnesses are very common in the community. The water containers that the people use to get water to their houses are open, and the water can easily become contaminated during transportation. This is especially true during the dry season when there is a lot of dust. Having water piped directly to their homes will eliminate this risk of contamination. 

Community Involvement

The community is involved with every aspect of the project. While they will not make a monetary contribution, they will contribute labor towards the project, and have donated the land required to dig a new well and build the distribution system.  

The other need is for clean water. Gastrointestinal illnesses are very common in the community. The water containers that the people use to get water to their houses are open, and the water can easily become contaminated during transportation. This is especially true during the dry season when there is a lot of dust. Having water piped directly to their homes will eliminate this risk of contamination. 

Community Involvement

The community is involved with every aspect of the project. While they will not make a monetary contribution, they will contribute labor towards the project, and have donated the land required to dig a new well and build the distribution system.  

measure1

A Committee of Potable Water and Sanitation (Comite de Agua Potable y Sanamiento – (CAPS)), as required by Nicaragua law, has been formed from, and elected by, members of the community. CAPS will be responsible for monitoring the system, coordinating any maintenance required, and handling the community fund.

Meters will be installed at each home connected to the water system, and the committee will determine the cost per cubic meter of water. This will allow the community to save funds for future repairs, replacing parts, or improving the system. Putting a price on the water also will encourage water conservation for all community members. 

Training plan for CAPS

The committee will be trained, as required by law. They will also attend trainings held by the Municipality or members of the national water company. CoCoDA, Hydratelife and MCN will also offer guidance and support based on more than 20 years of experience with water systems. Alex Martinez, the solar engineer, will train the committee on the solar components. 

A Committee of Potable Water and Sanitation (Comite de Agua Potable y Sanamiento – (CAPS)), as required by Nicaragua law, has been formed from, and elected by, members of the community. CAPS will be responsible for monitoring the system, coordinating any maintenance required, and handling the community fund.

Meters will be installed at each home connected to the water system, and the committee will determine the cost per cubic meter of water. This will allow the community to save funds for future repairs, replacing parts, or improving the system. Putting a price on the water also will encourage water conservation for all community members. 

Training plan for CAPS

The committee will be trained, as required by law. They will also attend trainings held by the Municipality or members of the national water company. CoCoDA, Hydratelife and MCN will also offer guidance and support based on more than 20 years of experience with water systems. Alex Martinez, the solar engineer, will train the committee on the solar components. 

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