Sanitation

Nudge, Don’t Shove: A Case for Reflexive WASH Behavioral Change, Part I

About the author: Stephanie Tam specializes in behavioral approaches to sanitation and hygiene in international development, with a focus on how cultural practices mediate the impact of technology in operations and maintenance. A graduate of the Harvard Graduate School of Design, she has been working on human behavior through the lenses of performance studies and behavioral economics, and thanks Dilip Soman at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto for support on this current project. She is deeplycontinue reading

Water Heroes – Dr. Peter Morgan: 2013 Stockholm Water Prize Winner

Water Heroes – Dr. Peter Morgan: 2013 Stockholm Water Prize Winner

There are a lot of good people in the world that are making great efforts to bring clean water and improved sanitation facilities to those who need it throughout the world, and their efforts are paying off.  Between 1990 and 2010 two billion people gained access to clean water and 1.8 billion people gained access to improved sanitation facilities according to the World Health Organization.  Even with these encouraging figures, there are still a lot of people in the worldcontinue reading

A DIFFERENT APPROACH: SCHOOL-LED TOTAL SANITATION – PART 2

In part 1 I gave a brief introduction into what SLTS is and its objectives as well as talking about the different components of SLTS.  If you missed part 1 you can read it here.  Today I’m going to write about the strategy used for SLTS. One thing that I wanted to say, and that I may have mentioned last time, is that I’m not entirely in agreement about some of the strategy used with SLTS.  Basically, the SLTS strategycontinue reading

A Different Approach: School-Led Total Sanitation – Part 1

As of 2011, sanitation coverage worldwide was at 64%.  With a worldwide population of just over seven billion this means that two and a half billion people still do not have access to improved sanitation facilities.  Of these people, just over one billion still practice open defecation.  Lack of proper sanitation and hygiene often leads to poor health and polluted water, which in turn leads to less production, less time in school, and many deaths worldwide. One methodology that iscontinue reading

Celebrating World Water Day 2013

In honor of World Water Day on March 22 I wanted to give you a brief history on World Water Day.  Before I do that let’s look at some facts about water and the worldwide water (and sanitation) crisis: If you look at all the water in the world you’d find that: 97.5% of it is saltwater and therefore cannot be used for drinking water (it could be desalinated, but this is costly and takes a lot of energy, pluscontinue reading

Water Heroes : Anjali Sarker and Toilet+

Water Heroes : Anjali Sarker and Toilet+

Is there a monster under my bed?  Or maybe something lurking in my closet?  Probably not, but for a child growing up in a developed country these are the kinds of fears that can rule their bedtime.  Silly? Yes, and as a child grows up they will realize that it was all in their mind.  Anjali Sarker had a different fear growing up, and one that was actually based in reality.  While growing up in a rural Bangladeshi village Anjali’scontinue reading

Saving Lives with Community-Led Total Sanitation

Without water people cannot survive, but without good sanitation and hygiene practices the water available could become contaminated and lead to disease and death.  Every year 1.5 million people, most of them children, die from complications associated with diarrhea that they picked up from dirty water.  According to the World Health Organization (WHO) 88% of diarrhea cases worldwide are linked to unsafe water, inadequate sanitation or insufficient hygiene.  Diarrhea is caused by bacteria that get into the water system, andcontinue reading

Eco-Latrine of the Future: Tiger Toilets

Sanitation is a huge problem in developing nations.  While the world has made significant progress on providing clean water to those who need it leaders have fallen behind when it comes to sanitation.  The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation put sanitation as a high priority for their organization, and with that in mind they funded the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s Sanitation Ventures project.  Because most people in developing nations don’t have infrastructure to take away the wastecontinue reading

New Tech Helps Improve Sanitation in Jakarta Slums

Take a look at the picture above of a slum in Jakarta, Indonesia.  Now tell me how you would get a typical large sanitation truck through the slum in order to collect human “sludge”.  That’s a question that Mercy Corps’ Indonesian team asked themselves, and they came up with a great answer. In Indonesia 50,000 people die every year as a result of poor sanitation, most of them being in slums like the one above.  It’s understandable since none ofcontinue reading

PHAST: Helping People to Help Themselves

Today I’m going to be talking about a methodology called PHAST that is used by organizations around the world and is based around the idea that for something to be successful you need to get the people it’s supposed to help involved.  PHAST, which stands for Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation, is a participatory method that engages communities and educates them on hygiene and sanitation as well as encouraging them to take responsibility for the management of water and sanitationcontinue reading

125queries in 0.740 seconds